Tagged: smith

Exactly Why Are You Upset?


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I am not here to preach or to stand on any moral high-ground, but I will share this:

We are all spoiled, thoughtless and oblivious. Just Say’n.

I have had the oddest dilemma lately since I have moved to the big city. I do not know how to react-respond-what to do or what not to do, when I am confronted by all the homeless people on EVERY steeet Corner. I get the double whammy of feeling bad. I am in a warm car heading to work or home, wearing a chefs jacket. I believe  the homeless and the hungry look at me and think, “What an asshole! He is warm, has a job and works with food, al the time.”  That is what I believe they are thinking when they look at me sitting in my car, not trying to make eye contact. I know that’s shitty but I admit it. What am I to do? I’m not going to fake a phone call or act like I’m texting somebody, like a lot of people I have witnessed.

A good friend just shared this video with me. I think it should be passed around. It’s a message taken to heart. I know for a fact, I will never be this guy. But that does not mean that I can’t do something.

The greatest man in the world video

I do know this, if I have something or anything to give,  I probably will offer it.

What would be the worst thing that can happen? I’m out a buck or five? That’s pretty petty from a guy that is going home from work that tastes food for a living.

Please share this to someone who cares.

Glenn

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125 Plates + A Ton of Talent.


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I’m a guy who has made his life in the food world by unusual means, I don’t always get the opportunity to spend time in traditional kitchens. When you are in a business that requires you to seek consistent, well organized plan of attacks, you are going into a battle, not armed with weapons of force and steel, but with heat and flavors to win over your critical foe.

I had the chance to join up with some peers and was asked to be the photographer and videographer of a fundraising event that took place at the now closed Six89 main restaurant which was a Chef Mark Fischer  concept in Carbondale, Colorado.

These events are always a ton of fun to be involved with. If you have never been to a James Beard event or a Slow Food event, you are missing out on something special.Each one of the organizations do amazing things for the food world.

The James Beard Foundation’s mission: ” is to celebrate, preserve, and nurture America’s culinary heritage and future”,  from the James Beard Foundation website. In the food world, to receive a James Beard award is like winning an Oscar. 

Slow Food’s mission: Slow Food works to defend biodiversity in our food supply, spread taste education and connect producers of excellent foods with co-producers through events and initiatives. This is world changing stuff. 

As a guest, you get the chance to sample a selection of different dishes prepared by a number of different chefs who took time away from their own restaurant to be involved. 99% of the time, the Chef will be there cooking and not sending his or her minions, which is always a good thing.

As chefs, we get the chance to create something special, unique and inventive at these events. Not only to wow the guest but to throw down some culinary ego just to get favorable response from our peers. Sure, we all go in there with 100% good intentions but no one will show up with that “caesar salad” the restaurant got famous for. That would be just stupid. We have a chance to work with and not just sit and bullshit with, other great chefs and try to WOW them with a cool new idea or a inventive presentation. Yes we are a territorial lot, bitches.

I love these events and have been involved with many of them. I find them inspiring and a chance to get to know other ‘like kinds’ with a purpose.

I made this short video to share the teamwork of a working kitchen during a plating of one of the dishes. Just take note that this is the first time that many of these chefs have ever worked together. Watch the rhythm of how they assemble the plate and the focus and joy everyone of them is experiencing. Enjoy this and please leave your comments. Please be sure to follow this blog and share it with your friends.

Glenn Smith

Chefglennsmith.com

justglenn

Thanks to Mark Fischer, Frank Bonanno, John littleAlex Seidel, Will Nolan, Nikki Newman,Bryce Eric Orblom, The staff of Six89, Fruition, 8K, The Pullman

(I know I have forgotten to mention a number of people in this video to this list, Please contact me and I will add you and your links to this blog.)

I prefer my salad Chopped!


Chopped salad

Here’s the deal. I have been doing my best to eat better, save some money and try to make all of my Crossfit efforts count. So this is what I have been doing. I cut the sugar. I cut eating wheat, grains, booze, soda and, you know, all the good stuff.

But you want to know something? It has been much easier than I would have thought. The only  thing I truly miss is a little something sweet. So I sometimes indulge with a small bite of something, small being the big word. So what I have been doing is making food I really want to eat. So tonight I made a really good, really simple, really chopped salad with sausage and kale soup.

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Here is the ingredients for the salad. I am not going to give you the amounts for anything because it can be as much or as little of each ingredient as you like.

Cucumber, cut into chunks

Celery, cut thinly

Brussel Sprouts sliced very thin (think coleslaw)

Green onions, chopped

Butternut Squash, peeled, seeded, med diced and roasted in a 350 degree oven until soft. Let cool

Green Grapes, cut in half

Avocado, diced

Romain Lettuce, chopped fine

Combine all of this in a large enough bowl and toss. Add the following dressing just before service

Dressed with Honey Mustard dressing

1 tablespoon mustard, your choice

1 tablespoon honey

1 part white vinegar or your choice

3 parts EVOO

Salt to taste

I can tell you straight up. It is freaking good. I hope that you enjoy this.

Remember what our founding fathers said, “We the People, in order to form a more perfect salad…”

Glenn

P.S. Please take a survey that I am conducting for a project I am doing. Please click HERE. Thank you in advance.

Just answer the question!!!


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Dear Everybody!

I am working on a new project and I would LOVE your input. I have created a short survey about the current food world and I need some answers. Would you please take a moment and click the link below and fill it out for me. I would very much appreciate it.

Trust me, It is for the betterment of the world. Glenn’s food world survey.

Thanks in advance

Glenn

If you have an extra $90,000…I got something for you!


I have a love for simple, perfect machines. This 1940’s stapler for example;

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This little machine of simplicity is designed to do only one thing, it is meant to attach 2 or more piece of paper together and that is about it, But is it? By the nature of its design It has also become a very attractive object. By just looking at it, it tells you of an era, it has a story a soul. It represents the beginning of the “machine age”. You can just tell that it will weigh something, it freaking heavy! It does not look as if it was built for a profit margin but as something that will last the test of time.

When I look at motorcycles or bicycles, I look for the same qualities that I find in this stapler.

Just recently I have been on Ebay scanning the old motorcycles and stumbled across this little gem, A 1936 DKW Factory works racer (current bid of $75,000 at the time of the writing of this article) and it is so worth it. It tells you a story just sitting there!  Look below;

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This bike is SO out of my budget, but a boy can dream. Here is the link to the Ebay listing.

I like art, paintings, sculpture and so on, But THIS to me surpasses any painting I have ever admired. We are all aware of the old adage “form follows function” but this example needs to be reclassified as “function follows beauty”, That is a rarity.

I am interestes in what your favorite objects of desire might be? Please comment in the comment section, I look forward to seeing your lusts

Glenn

Check out my vintage motorcycle blog at Retrolust.me

City Guide, The Full Article.


 

Here is the full article that is posted on the Taylor Creek Fly Shop Blog. Be sure to check it out and give Kirk, Travis and Will a call, it is one of the best fly shops in the world.

The City Guide

It’s 7:10 in the morning not so long ago and I am headed into work. A year ago that would have meant getting out of bed, maybe taking a shower, putting on my guide shirt, grabbing my vest and rods, load up the truck and be at the fly shop with a total of an 8 minute commute. I would meet my clients for the day and go fishing wherever I felt it would be great on the Gold Medal waters of the Fryingpan and Roaring Fork rivers. That was my “work” for 18 years.

Today, I get out of bed, definitely take a shower, get dressed in my monkey suit, grab a coffee, get stuck in traffic, get aggravated and then try be the best employee I can be in the new city job I have recently taken on. I like the first paragraph of this story much better. 

The changes I have made to move to the big city are all for good reason, I was fishing for love and I landed her in Denver. So I made this commitment and moved from the Roaring Fork Valley to the “Big D” to begin my life with my bride to be. All of that is good. Here’s the catch though. This change of lifestyle does make guiding and my love of the river a bit, if not a lot, more difficult. So, it begs to be asked, how does a mountain guy, fly fishing guide adjust to his new surroundings?

He doesn’t. What he does do, is try to view the world through trout colored glasses. 

This summer, I was pining to go on the Fryingpan River, remembering the how the water rushed around my waders with the occasional caddis fly going up my nose. I had to get a fix. So I went down to South Platte River right here in downtown Denver and found an eddy behind a trashed grocery cart freshly thrown into the river. I took a number of big inhales through my nose to get a whiff of the fresh smog from a nearby factory to help transport me back to the place that I love. To my surprise it didn’t work. But I was still optimistic.

Just the other day on my way into work, I stopped in the coffee shop directly across the street from my house called Stella’s. I go there every day to get a medium cup of danger monkey dark and chat with whoever is behind the counter. This place is just like any other coffee shop in any other small town. The other morning I noticed a pick-up truck with the license plate ‘6X20RS2’ (referencing the fly pattern, an RS2, and the size of the fly and tippet). Now that is a very specific vanity plate. A big smile came across my face and I just had to go and find out who this person was. I strolled around and found the only guy (this is not sexist statement, there was only dudes in the coffee shop) that fit the “I like getting a line wet” look. 

Let me stop here for a moment. There are always two perspectives when you live in a destination resort area; the locals and the tourists. I have always been a local, very rarely a tourist. So, it is not uncommon for us locals to strike up a conversation with someone that you might not know and talk about anything – fishing, skiing, biking, whatever. They are often just excited to be there and to get an inside scoop on what’s going on out there and what bug is hot. 

I say to this guy, “Dude, is that your truck? You must fly-fish. That’s pretty light tippet.” This is when I realized I wasn’t in Kansas anymore. A curt “Ya-and…?” is all I got. Nothing, zilch, nada. I found myself standing there awkwardly, not as a knowledgeable local guide with an information starved tourist or as tourist with tourist getting ready to swap fish stories, but instead as the guy interrupting said dude with newspaper. Awkward. So I mentioned that I was a guide – still nothing. I got my coffee, did the customary guy head nod and went on my way somewhat jaded.

But I am not discouraged; there is hope. 

The great part of moving here is that I live by Wash Park. An incredibly beautiful open space in the center of Denver, filled with volleyball players, freshly parented 30 somethings with BMW baby joggers, yoga pants and iPhones. Off in the distance I see two people, both with fly rods, casting on the grass, horribly. “A-ha” my inner guide senses whispered to me. I walk up and ask, “How’s it going?” sheepishly, doing my best not to look like weird random park conversation guy. “Where are you going fishing?” I ask. They look at me and mutter, “Nowhere yet, just practicing.” the worst caster say’s. “That’s cool. Can I show you a couple tricks that might help? I do a lot of this……I’m a guide out of Basalt.” I say. “Ya, so you fish in the pan? Come on over.” they reply. The guide in me is satisfied.

I wouldn’t be telling you the truth if I said it has been easy to be so far away from the activity that I love so much, but I will say that it will always be a part of me. Guiding is so much more that just taking somebody fishing. It’s about relationships and sharing common interest. I may not be near gold medal waters anymore but I can still share and teach the art of fly fishing. That is, if fly-fishing in a random patch of grass, doing my best to be a city guide counts.

Glenn Smith
18 year Taylor Creek guide, 1st year city guide, life time teacher

Top Ten Survival Tips for a Broke Fly Fishing Guide Living in an Expensive Place.


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(This is an article I wrote for Taylor Creek Fly shop which I was a professional guide for 18 years.I also submitted to The Drake Magazine, I think it’s pretty good. Let me know your thoughts.)

Aspen. The mere whispering of the word congers up images of Paris Hilton, Man-Furs, Range Rovers and million dollar homes. And for the most part, that would be 100 % accurate. But Aspen, like any mountain resort town, is also filled with mountains and rivers that provide great outdoor activities. Many wealthy people enjoy that – as a matter of fact, most people enjoy that. Unfortunately, that “access” to the great outdoors, indirectly costs money.

You have to find a creative way to live in one of the most expensive places in the U.S.. Common sense told me that since I loved the outdoors and mastering legendary trout waters like the Frying Pan, Roaring Fork and the Colorado, becoming a professional fly fishing guide for a living was an obvious choice. But we guides are dealt a difficult set of cards.

First card: Getting on the shop roster is not always an easy task, even if you do happen to be one of the best anglers in the valley. I have been a guide with Taylor Creek Fly Shop in Basalt for the last 18+ years and I only landed it because a) I got a good referral from a buddy that was a guide there, b) I spent so much money there on new rods, flies and every other thing I needed to “fish properly” (besides, I felt it gave me a bit of credibility) and c) I was able to “talk the talk” and “walk the walk”.

Second card: You need money both for a place to live and so you can eat. This lifestyle can be especially difficult if you are on the bottom of the guide ladder. It’s only when the senior guides are not available when you get the trip. Being the low man on the totem pole, you have to hope for a last minute booked trip or wait by the phone all day hoping you’re next on the list to call. The lack of consistent last minute trips or senior guides calling in sick or being on vacation, can lead to financial stress and inconsistent diet. The only known consistency for a guide is understanding that the last minute bookers are not typically the seasoned fishermen you hope for. And chances are, these people will have recently watched “The Movie” and now they want their spoiled 5 year old daughter and disinterested 14 year old son to experience what catching a 20 inch rainbow is like – “just like the one Brad Pitt caught in A River Runs Through It” while yelling across the river, “You haven’t caught one yet?” only ten minutes after hitting the water.

But I digress. What I am trying to say is that guides need money. So I’d like to share with you my ten survival tips on how to live, eat and breathe fly fishing as a professional guide when you are broke and have to make it in an expensive area.

Tip # 1: Be nice, polite and humble. Nothing will keep you from getting trips or moving up the ranks more than arrogance. Chances are, you are not the greatest fisherman alive and you didn’t really “land a hundred” or “get the biggest cut-bow in the Pan”. The fact is, the guides in “real” fly shops are ALL great fisherman. The best thing you can do is go fishing with the senior guides and prove you know how to fish. But most importantly, be cool about it! This will pay off in spades. You are more likely to be the first one asked to accompany the senior guide on group trips. That equals no bottom of the totem pole which means more money.

Tip #2: Top Ramen is not all that bad. Really. Throw in some fresh vegetables and soy sauce and you’re golden.

Tip #3: Having a truck is helpful. It provides a comfortable ride for your clients as well as a great place to sleep. The forest service provides camp areas for up to 10 days or more. Not only is it a practical mode of transportation and lodging, but that it just makes for a good story when you decide to give up guiding in order to finally use your Political Science degree.

Tip # 4: Beer is not food. Once you get a couple of trips and you make your first tip above and beyond your guide fee, try not to turn that extra money into a series of cocktails for the boys. You need that money. It won’t be there in a few months. (Note to the veteran guides: hang around the new guides, they’re rookie enough to always be buying! By doing so, you can keep your tips.)

Tip #5: Network and always carry business cards. This is a must. Anybody on the river that isn’t already a fishing guide, wants to be. That instantly makes you the most envied and the coolest person they know. Use that to your advantage. Your perceived coolness, especially if you make the client think they caught that brown all on their own, equated to referrals, shop status and money. Don’t be a slacker trout bum, it’s still abusiness. Always be selling (yourself)!

Tip #6: Remember, the rich are different. Embrace it. It is likely that a fleet of Range Rovers show up and they all step out with enough gear to stock a new shop. That doesn’t mean a thing. The fish don’t care and nor should you. They’re people – just like you (but with a lot more money). There’s no need to suck up. Treat them like you want to be treated and, trust me, you will be rewarded by either a great tip or a new regular repeat client.

Tip# 7: Practice the three “T’s” – Teach, Therapy, and Tolerance. Being a great guide is not how good of a fisherman you are (although it helps), it’s more about how well you understand your client. I did a trip one year with a client that I had guided a few times before. This trip she wanted to fish a little bit, but what she really wanted to do was to learn how to drive a stick shift. So our day was planned out where we fished for an hour, teach her how to drive my stick shifted-car for three hours, then fish again for an hour. She was a client for years. She booked consistently and always tipped well but what I found the most rewarding was never knowing exactly what we were going to do the day I was fishing with her.

Tip#8: Don’t sleep with any of your clients (see fishing above). Nothing good can come from this. Worst of all, you have turned a paying client into a non-paying client with “benefits”. And if it turns bad, like it always will, and their husband or wife finds out, there goes all of their referred client friends and any potential for new referrals from them.

Tip# 9: Have another skill. It can be anything from tuning skis to bartending to instructing snowboarders to practicing law. Also, being a trust funder, salt-water fly guide, or a chef, will work. It is not only important to have a plan, but as a fly guide in a touristic, seasonal, resort destination, with unpredictable run-off and conditions, you must also have a Plan B, and C all the way up to Z. Sure, some people can and do make it as a full time guide, but only if you are willing to budget. Unfortunately, most guides are fiscally inept and easily led astray by being surrounded by pro-deals and new gear in the shop – there is always that new reel or new 9-weight rod you might need for that Christmas Island trip you’ve been saving up for. This one I know from experience.

Tip # 10: If you really love fly-fishing, you love the river and everything it offers. Remember that you weren’t born an expert fly fisherman and your clients want to learn from you. You’re on the right path. It’s not hard to survive if you’re smart about it.

So if your ambition is to become a wealthy, full-time fly fishing guide, traveling around the globe and living the lifestyle, go for it. The fact is, I live that life style. I may not wear Man-Fur or have enough money to date Paris Hilton, but I am rich in experience and I have made a bank load of friends. The only cash I have is a CD in my truck of Johnny Cash, Folsom Prison Blues. To tell you the truth, I wouldn’t change a thing.

Glenn Smith